Rental Car & Driving Tips

Truck vs Car vs Pulperia Accident - Truck Wins!
Truck vs Car vs Pulperia Accident – Truck Wins!

Driving a rental car in Costa Rica has distinct advantages and disadvantages, but if you do get behind the wheel you’ll be happier and safer if you heed the driving tips below.

  • Slow down and be careful.  You are in an unfamiliar environment, and the unexpected is the rule rather than the exception.
  • Driving at night is not recommended—It is dangerous because of the high percentage of other drivers who have been drinking, the inability to see potholes in the dark, precipitous drop-offs without guardrails, and because you will miss all of the scenery.  Another danger is car-jackers or robacarros and bajonazos who strike almost exclusively after dark (and almost exclusively in San José.
  • If you can afford it rent a large SUV with full air bags (many of the smaller ones have none).  Fatal accidents are ~10 times more common in Costa Rica than the U.S.
  • Cones & Flares—The Tico version of orange cones and highway flares is a branch or pile of sticks in the road.  Slow down, there is probably a dangerous situation ahead.
  • Do not leave anything of value in your car, ever—Not only is it likely that it will be stolen, but you may be responsible for the damage the thieves do getting it out.
  • Tickets—Modern traffic enforcement exists in Costa Rica and you can expect to face radar guns.  Most countries in Central America have well established cultures of “tipping” and bribery; Costa Rica is one of them but we don’t ever recommend that you pay your “fine” on the roadside (tips on bribery).
    You can have your rental agency pay the fine for you when you turn the car in.
  • Stay off the area just above high tide line—Driving is generally prohibited on Costa Rican beaches, but on the few where it is allowed please avoid the sand between the high tide mark and the trees because this is where the sea turtles make their nests.
  • Don’t count on road signs for navigation—Although the situation is slowly improving there are very few.
  • A GPS for turn by turn and a good map for the big picture are the best ways to navigate.